The Deep Under-Cover Officer One Response to the Terrorist Threat

Speaking from personal experience as a former deep undercover officer in the New York City Police Department I submit that the most effective, and ultimately least intrusive method for the general population to endure in order to prevent a repetition of the September 2001 attack, is through infiltration of groups likely to be involved in such acts.

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This Court Finds You Guilty: Implications of the Use of Force for the Law Enforcement Professional

Many New York City cops know officers who have faced criminal prosecution as a result of having used force in the line of duty. Most of these prosecutions involve cases where the officer involved discharged a firearm resulting in the death of an individual. Prosecutions for firearms discharges by police in non-fatal injuries incidents are much less common. Regardless of the injury, every officer knows that when they fire their weapon an exhaustive investigation will result; nevertheless, many officers find themselves in a state of disbelief when it happens to them. When officers find themselves facing prosecution for what they felt was a routine use of non-lethal force, they often suffer a debilitating sense of disbelief over the consequences of their action. The purpose of this column is to examine the fallout from the use of “non-lethal force” resulting in a death or injury.

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