We Can Prevent Aviation Terrorism

A number of highly respected sources usually turned to for creative thinking on issues of crime and terrorism were seen giving television interviews with a very disturbing “deer in the head lights” look I in their eyes.  While I didn’t expect to hear too much creative thinking so soon after a terrorism attack of this magnitude, there was something new about the tone and content of the opinions being given.  There was a focus on the failure of Belgium law enforcement to foresee these attacks and in time at least to limit their scope.  Much of the critical commentary centered on the arrest last week of the sought after Paris attack terrorist, Salah Abdeslam.

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Our Commercial Airports Remain As Safe As Ever

Commercial aviation remains as safe as ever – or to put it another way, it was never really safe from intentional acts of sabotage, hijacking and in-flight violence; clearly not much has changed. The most recent report on airport security reveals that all manner of contraband continues to get through the eight billion dollar security program designed to prevent terrorists from striking our commercial aviation system.

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Screening Both Passengers and Their Baggage

Building a Passenger Profile
Relying on advanced hardening of flight deck doors, closed circuit television of the passenger cabin to monitor disruptions, and with the addition of air marshals and security- trained flight attendants to control unruly passengers, TSA is ready to begin trying to predict in advance passengers who need additional security examinations.

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44 Key Issues in Aviation Security for 2006

1. Physical screening of airport employees and vendors.
2. Responsibility for overall domestic aviation and airport security.
3. Explosive detection systems.
4. Explosive Trace Detection.
5. Profiling of passengers.
6. Registered traveler program.
7. Criminal background investigations of aviation industry workers.
8. Private security companies role in aviation security.
9. Flight deck doors.
10. Transponders.
11. Arming of pilots.
12. Security training of flight attendants.
13. Response to security breaches.
14. Passenger manifests on overseas flights to the U.S.
15. Passenger responses to in-flight security breaches.
16. Screener selection programs.
17. Screener supervisors.
18. Federal Security Directors.
19. Interdiction of weapons
20. Interdiction of explosives.
21. Trace detection equipment.
22. Back-scatter machines.
23. “Puffer machines.”
24. Prohibited items lists.
25. CAPPS program.
26. Secondary screening searches.
27. “Shoe Bombs.”
28. CTX machines.
29. Positive bag matching.
30. “No-fly” lists.
31. “Watch lists.”
32. Federal Air Marshals.
33. Airport perimeters.
34. Airport anti-missile systems.
35. Biometrics.
36. Screener privatization.
37. Fining passengers for screening violations.
38. Air cargo security.
39. Airport law enforcement officers.
40. Intelligence information response.
41. Suicide bombers in airports.
42. The Safety Act.
43. Liability for negligent security at airports.
44. Inspector general reports on security failures.

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